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Student Research Grant in Audiology Recipients

Doctoral students in communication sciences and disorders who desire to conduct research in clinical and/or rehabilitative audiology are eligible to compete for the Student Research Grant in Audiology for a proposed one-year study. Supported by the Ira M. Ventry and Brad W. Friedrich Memorial Funds.

2016

Awarded $2,000 each

Pudrith_2016_SRG-AudCharles Pudrith
PhD Candidate
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Mentor: Susan Phillips
"Association of Melanocortin Receptor 1 and Susceptibility to Noise Induced Hearing Loss Within Caucasians"


Shin_2016_SRG-AudSujin Shin
PhD Candidate
University of Texas at Dallas
Mentor: William Katz
"Cognitive Factors Involved in the Speaking Rate Difficulties in Children With Cochlear Implants"


2015

Awarded $2,000 each

2015-Monoker-SRG-AudChanie Monoker
PhD Candidate
City University of New York
Mentor: Brett Martin
"A Study of the Acoustic Change Complex in People With a History of Otitis Media"


2015-Stewart-SRG-ECLElizabeth C. Stewart
PhD Candidate
Arizona State University
Mentor: Andrea Pittman
"What Can We Know in a Tenth of a Second? Examining the Relation Between Subcortical Neurophysiologic Response Latency and Auditory Learning"


2014

Awarded $2,000 each

2014_Osman_SRG_AUDHomira Osman
AuD/PhD Candidate
University of Washington
Mentor: Jessica Sullivan
"Effect of Classroom Noise on Auditory Working Memory and Comprehension in Children"


2014_Reinhart_SRG-AUDPaul Reinhart
PhD Candidate
Northwestern University
Mentor: Pamela Souza
"Subjective and Objective Effects of the Interaction Between Cognition and Hearing Aid Processing on Reverberant Speech"


2013

Awarded $2,000

2013_Mulrooney_SRG_AUDTia Mulrooney
AuD Candidate
Arizona State University
Mentor: Andrea Pittman
"The Effects of Verified vs. Unverified Hearing Aid Settings on Word-Learning in Children"


2012

Awarded $2,000

2012 Lewis - SRG AUDJames D. Lewis
PhD Candidate
University of Iowa
Mentor: Shawn S. Goodman
"Efferent Optimization of Signal-to-Noise Ratio"


2010

Awarded $2,000

2010StudentResearchGrantAud-IanMertesIan B. Mertes
AuD/PhD candidate, The University of Iowa
Mentor: Shawn S. Goodman
"Clinical Utility of Early and Late Transient-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions Components"


2009

Awarded $2,000

2009StudentResearchGrantAud-YunfangZhengYunfang Zheng
Montclair State University
Mentor: Janet Koehnke
"Effects of Noise and Reverberation on Sound Localization for Listeners with Bilateral Cochlear Implants"


2008

Awarded $2,000

Tara D. Reed Tara D. Reed
University of Texas at Dallas
Mentor: James F. Jerger
"Effects of Aging on Interaural Asymmetry in a Competing Speech Task"


2007

Awarded $2,000

Faith M. Parker Faith M. Parker
Montclair State University
Mentor: Janet Koehnke
"The Effects of Age and Reverberation on Cortical Audiotry Processing"


2006

Awarded $2,000

Yu-Hsiang Wu Yu-Hsiang Wu
University of Iowa
Mentor: Ruth Bentler
"Impact of Visual Cues on Microphone Mode Preference"


2005

Awarded $2,000

Lauren Calandruccio Lauren Calandruccio
Syracuse University
Mentor: Karen A. Doherty
"Frequency-Weighting Strategies for Sentences Estimated by the Correlational Method for Listeners with Normal Hearing and Hearing Impairment"


2004

Awarded $2,000

Gary Overson Gary Overson
University of Texas at Dallas
Mentor: James Jerger
"Auditory Evoked Potentials in Older Hearing Aid Users Using Continuous Discourse in a Monotic and Dichotic Listening Task"


2003

Awarded $2,000

Jessica Day Jessica E. Day
University of Washington
Mentor: M. Patrick Feeney
"The Effect of 226 Hz Probe Level on Acoustic Reflex Thresholds"

Jessica Day is a doctoral student in audiology at the University of Washington. Jessica is interested in recent research that has shown the level of the 226 Hz probe used to measure the acoustic reflex (as high as 90 dB SPL) is high enough to elicit a reflex itself, which may compromise the sensitivity of the reflex threshold measurement, thus elevating reflex thresholds. Her study will measure contralateral reflex thresholds using five 226 Hz probe levels from 65 to 85 dB SPL in five dB steps in 40 young adults. Results will be compared to those obtained with a commercial system using the same activator stimulus with an 85 dB SPL probe tone. A repeated measures analysis of variance will be used to test for differences in the reflex threshold across the six reflex conditions.

2002

Awarded $2,000

Rachael Anneke Frush Holt Rachael Anneke Frush Holt
University of Minnesota
Mentor: Arlene Earley Carney
"Non-Sensory Factors in Children's Speech Perception"

Rachael Holt is a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota whose long-term goal is to develop a model of children's speech perception that will include sensory factors (such as hearing level), non-sensory factors (such as attention and memory), and potential perceptual-cognitive facts (such as phonemic awareness). The need for speech perception testing in children has increased dramatically with the evaluation of the efficacy of hearing aids and cochlear implants, but many current tests assess word recognition only and fail to separate speech perception ability from vocabulary. In this study the change/no change procedure will be used with normal-hearing adults and children using three pairs of stimuli and various numbers of standard and comparison stimuli to investigate the hypotheses that performance will improve with increased total numbers of "looks" at the stimuli, the number of standards will be more important than the number of comparisons, the number of presentations of stimuli will be more beneficial to child than adult participants, and the impact of two non-sensory factors (response bias and multiple looks at the stimuli) on child speech perception will be assessed. Ms. Holt anticipates that addressing these procedural and developmental issues will give the change/no change procedure more widespread use as a speech perception measure that can separate speech perception ability from vocabulary.

2001

Awarded $2,000

Lorienne Jenstad Lorienne Jenstad
University of Washington
Mentor: Pamela Souza
"Effect of Comparison Time on Speech Acoustics and Intelligibility"

Lorienne Jenstad is working on her doctoral degree at the University of Washington where she is researching compression amplification in hearing aids and its effect upon speech intelligibility. Hearing aids process sounds by means of compression, and an adjustable feature of such aids is release time, which refers to the time necessary for the hearing aid to react to a change in level. The research done so far in this area has provided conflicting results, and it has still not been determined what is the best way to set this parameter for optimal speech recognition. Ms. Jenstad will conduct a systematic study of the effects of release time on the speech signal (a digital electroacoustic measurement) and on speech intelligibility (a measurement of intelligibility by a human listener). The intelligibility data will be compared to the electroacoustic data, and the subsequent analysis will be used to determine which speech cues are altered by the different release times and which alterations interfere with or enhance speech intelligibility. The results of this systematic study will add to the understanding of the effects of compression processing on speech, and provide a basis for clinical recommendations about the setting of compression release time.

Maureen P. Coughlin Maureen P. Coughlin
Indiana University
Mentor: Larry E. Humes
"The Relation Between Audiovisual Speech Perception and Reported Benefit on the Hearing Aid Performance Inventory (HAPI)"

Maureen P. Coughlin is pursuing her doctoral degree at the University of Indiana where she is investigating the role that visual information plays in speech recognition. Her hypothesis is that listeners who report less benefit from hearing aids are generally less adept at using visual cues, such as lip reading, to augment the strictly auditory benefit of the hearing aid. Objective benefit is usually measured using only the auditory sense. If the hypothesis is correct, it would help explain why objective measures of hearing aid benefit frequently do not correspond with subjective reports from hearing aid users in real situations. The results of the study will provide a greater insight into the connection between the objective laboratory measure of speech recognition and a subjective real world performance measure.

2000

Awarded $2,000

Lori Leibold Lori Leibold
University of Washington
Mentors: Richard Folsom and Lynne Werner
"The Investigation of Loudness Perception in Normal-Hearing Infants and Adults Using Reaction Time and ABR Wave V Amplitude"

Lori Leibold is completing her doctoral degree at the University of Washington where she is researching the growth of loudness in infants and adults using both a behavioral and physiological measure. Reaction time and ABR wave V amplitudes from young adults and infants in both quiet and noise will be obtained and compared in order to examine their relationship. Results of Leibold's work will provide further insight into the loudness perception in infants and will add to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in hearing development.

1999

Awarded $2,000

Tracey S. Fitzgerald
Syracuse University
Mentor: Beth A. Prieve
"Examination of the 2f2-fl Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emission in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Ears and Its Potential for Use in the Detection of Hearing Loss"

Tracey S. Fitzgerald is currently completing her doctoral degree in audiology at Syracuse University with the intention of seeking a faculty position at a university upon completion of her degree. She is the recipient of a $2,000 research grant supported by the Ventry and Friedrich Memorial Funds. Her primary research interests are in the area of diagnostic audiology, including otoacoustic emissions and electrophysiological measures of hearing. Ms. Fitzgerald intends to investigate whether the use of the distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), 2f2-f1, will detect hearing loss at frequencies below 2000 Hz with greater accuracy than the DPOAE that produces the largest amplitude, 2f1-f2. Currently, the DPOAE 2f1-f2 measures frequencies of 2000-6000 Hz with great accuracy, however test performance is poor below 2000 Hz. The effects of different stimulus parameters on 2f2-f1 and 2f1-f2 amplitude measured in both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired ears will be examined. The optimal stimulus parameters for detecting hearing loss for both DPOAEs will be determined. DPOAEs for a larger group of hearing-impaired subjects will be measured using the optimal stimulus parameter for both 2f2-f1 and 2f1-f2. Results from both the normal-hearing and hearing-impaired group will be analyzed to determine whether 2f2-f1 measures improve our ability to detect hearing loss at frequencies below 2000 Hz.

1998

Awarded $2,000

Sarah Ferguson Sarah Hargus Ferguson
Indiana University
Mentor: Diane Kewley-Port
"Clear Versus Conversational Speech: Acoustic Correlates of Talker-Generated Intelligibility Differences for Listeners With Normal and Impaired Hearing"

Sarah Ferguson is a first-year doctoral student from Indiana University. Her research mentor is Dr. Diane Kewley-Port. Her primary research interest is speech understanding in the elderly.

Ms. Ferguson's study will investigate the relationship between acoustic properties of vowels and their identification in clear and conversational speech, and the effects of hearing loss and amplification on this relationship. Vowel stimuli in one and two-syllable words taken from sentences spoken clearly or conversationally will be presented in a background of 12-talker babble for identification by two subject groups. The two groups consist of young listeners with normal hearing and elderly listeners with hearing impairment. Results of this research will increase our understanding of the acoustic properties responsible for the increased intelligibility of clear speech for listeners with impaired hearing as well as those with normal hearing. Finally, results will help guide future developments in hearing aid signal processing.

1997

Awarded $1,000

Andrea L. Page, University of Wisconsin­, Madison
Mentor: Terry L. Wiley
"The Perception of Speech Produced in Noise"

1996

Awarded $2,000

Vardit Lichtenstein, CUNY
Mentor: David R. Stapells
"The Effective Duration of the Stimulus for the Auditory Brainstem and Middle Latency Responses"

1995

Awarded $2,000

Pamela Souza, Syracuse University
Mentor: Christopher W. Turner
"Effect of Compression Amplification on the Temporal Cues of Speech for Hearing-Impaired Listeners"

1994

Awarded $2,000

Jo Manette Kathleen Nousak, City University of New York
"Loudness and Auditory Brainstem (ABR) and Middle Latency (MLR) Responses in Adults with Normal and Sensorineurally-Impaired Hearing"

1993

Awarded $2,000

Peggy Oates, City University of New York
"Frequency Specificity of the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) to 500 and 2000 Hz Linear-Versus Blackman-Windowed Tones"

1992

Awarded $2,000

Brett Martin, The Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York
"The Effect of Decreased Audibility, Produced by High-Pass Noise Masking, on Cortical Event-Related Potentials (N1-P2, Mismatch Negativity) to Speech Sounds (/da/, /ba/)"

1991

No Award

1990

Awarded $1,000

Susan R. Mahanes, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"Peripheral and Central Auditory Factors in Obscure Auditory Dysfunction"

1989

Awarded $1,000

Amy R. Horwitz, Syracuse University
"Effects of Different Frequency Response Strategies Upon Recognition and Preference for Audible Speech Stimuli"

1988

Awarded $1,000

Christine M. Gilmore, Memphis State University
"Effects of Changes in Maximum Output Setting on Hearing Aid Performance in the Real World"

1987

Awarded $1,000

M. Patrick Feeney, University of Washington
"The Effect of Distinctive Feature Scoring on the Split-Half Reliability of the California Consonant Test for Subjects With High Frequency Hearing Impairment"

1986

Awarded $1,000

Carolyn J. Brown, University of Iowa
"Inferior Colliculus Response to Peripheral Electrical Stimulation in Normal and Neonatally Deafened Rats"

1985

Awarded $1,000

Patricia W. Earl, University of Tennessee
"The Relationship Between the Auditory Brainstem Response Intensity Function and Magnitude Estimation of Loudness"

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